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Brooklyn Bed Bugs
We Specialize in Bed Bug Pest Control Extermination in all Five Boroughs of New York City, including:

Bed Bugs Pest Control Exterminator of Manhattan is your total affordable, reliable and quality source for residential and commercial pest control and extermination services in all five boroughs of New York City. Our expertly trained, licensed and certified pest control exterminator specialists can advise you on specific bed bug pest control extermination solutions to prevent re-occuring outbreaks of all kinds of pests.


Within our extensive pest control web site, we provide you with excellent resources for pest identification, insect information, pest images and recommended pest solutions when you call us.

Please call us now for more details and information, we are proud to serve you.

Map Of Brooklyn :: New York City



Brooklyn Neighborhoods: Bath Beach , Bay Ridge , Bedford Stuyvesant , Bensonhurst , Beorum Hill , Bergen Beach , Borough Park , Brooklyn Heights , Bushwick , Canarsie , Carroll Gardens , Cobble Hill , Crown Heights , Cypress Hill , Ditmas Park , Dyker Heights , East New York , Flatbush , Flatland , Fort Greene , Fort Hamilton , Fulton Ferry , Gerritsen Beach , Gravesend , Kensington , Marine Park , Midwood , Millbasin , Prospect Heights , Red Hook , Rugby , Sheepshead Bay , Sunset Park , Williamsburg , Windsor Terrace ,

Brooklyn Zips: 11201 , 11203 , 11205 , 11208 , 11209 , 11211 , 11214 , 11216 , 11217 , 11218 , 11219 , 11220 , 11221 , 11223 , 11225 , 11226 , 11228 , 11230 , 11231 , 11234 , 11235 , 11236 , 11238 , 11239

Map Usage

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  • Scaling and Repositioning toolbar is available. Click on the arrow of toolbar and move the map.
  • Click on the + and - signs of the toolbar to zoom in and zoom out the map respectively.
  • Click on satellite button to toggle for switching between the google map and satellite views.
  • Click on map button to toggle for switching between the satellite and google map views.
  • Click on hybrid button to see a hybrid of the satellite and google map views.

Brooklyn (named after the Dutch town Breukelen) is one of the five boroughs of New York City, located southwest of Queens on the western tip of Long Island. An independent city until its consolidation with New York in 1898, Brooklyn is New York City's most populous borough, with 2.5 million residents,[1] and second largest in area. If the borough were a separate city, it would be the fourth-largest city in the United States. Since 1896, Brooklyn has had the same boundaries as Kings County, which is now the most populous county in New York State, and the second most densely populated county in the United States, after New York County (Manhattan).

Though a part of New York City, Brooklyn maintains a distinct culture, independent art scene, and unique architectural heritage. Many Brooklyn neighborhoods are ethnic enclaves where particular ethnic groups and cultures predominate.

History

The Dutch were the first Europeans to settle in the area on the western end of Long Island, then largely inhabited by the Native American people, called the Lenape (often erroneously referred to by the Lenape place-name, "Canarsee", in contemporary colonial documents.) The first Dutch settlement, established in 1634, was called Midwout (Midwood).[6] The Dutch also purchased land during the 1630s from the Mohawks in present- day Gowanus, Red Hook, the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and Bushwick.[6] The Village of Breuckelen, named for Breukelen in the province of Utrecht in the Netherlands, was authorized by the Dutch West India Company in 1646; it became the first true municipality in what is now New York State. At the time, Breuckelen was part of New Netherland. Other villages which were later incorporated into Brooklyn were Boswijk (Bushwick), Nieuw Utrecht (New Utrecht), and Nieuw Amersfoort (Flatlands). A few houses and cemeteries still bear witness to the Dutch origins of the borough of Brooklyn.

The Dutch lost Breuckelen in the British conquest of New Netherland in 1664. In 1683, the British reorganized the Province of New York into twelve counties, each of which was sub-divided into towns. Over time, the name evolved from Breuckelen, to Brockland, to Brocklin, to Brookline, and eventually, to Brooklyn.[6] Kings County was one of the original counties, and Brooklyn was one of the original six towns within Kings County. The county was named in honor of King Charles II of England.

In August and September of 1776, the Battle of Long Island (also called the Battle of Brooklyn) was fought in Kings County. It was the first major battle in the American Revolutionary War following the Declaration of Independence and the largest battle of the entire conflict. While General George Washington's defeat on the battlefield cast early doubts on his abilities as a military tactician and leader, he did keep the Continental Army intact with a brilliant overnight tactical retreat, across the East River, a manoeuvre seen by historians as one of his greatest practical accomplishments.[10]

New York became the British political and military base of operations in North America. This encouraged the departure of patriots and their sympathizers while attracting loyalist refugees fleeing the other colonies. Loyalists swelled the population of the surrounding area, including Brooklyn. Correspondingly, the region became the focus of General Washington's intelligence activities (see Intelligence in the American Revolutionary War). The British also began to hold American patriot prisoners-of-war in rotting hulks anchored in Wallabout Bay off Brooklyn. More American prisoners died in these prison-ships than the sum of all the American battle casualties of the Revolutionary War.

The first half of the nineteenth century saw significant growth along the economically- strategic East River waterfront, across from New York City. Brooklyn's population expanded more than threefold between 1800 and 1820, doubled again in the 1820s, and doubled yet again during the 1830s. The county encompassed two cities: the City of Brooklyn and the City of Williamsburgh. Brooklyn annexed Williamsburgh in 1854, which lost its final "h" in the process. With the addition of this new area, Brooklyn grew from a substantial community of 36,236 to an imposing city of 96,838.

The building of rail links, such as the Brighton Beach Line in 1878 heralded explosive growth, and, in the space of a decade, the City of Brooklyn annexed the Town of New Lots in 1886, the Town of Flatbush, the Town of Gravesend, and the Town of New Utrecht in 1894, and the Town of Flatlands in 1896. Brooklyn had reached its natural municipal boundaries at the Kings County line.

In 1883, the Brooklyn Bridge was completed, and transportation to Manhattan no longer required a boat trip. Brooklyn now prepared to engage in the still-grander consolidation process developing throughout the region. In 1894, Brooklyn residents voted, by a slight majority, to join with Manhattan, The Bronx, Queens, and Richmond (later Staten Island) to become the five boroughs of the modern New York City. This referendum took effect in 1898. Kings County, nonetheless, retained its status as one of New York State's counties.

Economy

Brooklyn's job market is driven by three main factors: the performance of the national/city economy, population flows and the borough's position as a convenient back office for New York's businesses.

Forty-four percent of Brooklyn's employed population, or 410,000 people, work in the borough; more than half of the borough's residents work outside its boundaries. As a result, economic conditions in Manhattan are important to the borough's jobseekers. Strong international immigration to Brooklyn generates jobs in services, retailing and construction.

In recent years Brooklyn has benefited from a steady influx of financial back office operations from Manhattan, the rapid growth of a high-tech/entertainment economy in DUMBO, and strong growth in support services such as accounting, personal supply agencies and computer services firms.

Jobs in the borough have traditionally been concentrated in manufacturing, but since 1975, Brooklyn has shifted from a manufacturing-based economy to a service-based economy. In 2004, 215,000 Brooklyn residents worked in the services sector, while 27,500 worked in manufacturing. Although manufacturing has declined, a substantial base has remained in apparel and niche manufacturing concerns such as furniture, fabricated metals, and food products.The pharmaceutical company Pfizer has a manufacturing plant in Brooklyn that employs 990 workers. First established as a shipbuilding facility in 1801, the Brooklyn Navy Yard employed 70,000 people at is peak during World War II and was then the largest employer in the borough. The Missouri, the ship on which the Japanese formally surrendered, was built there, as was the iron-sided Civil War vessel the Monitor, and the Maine, whose sinking off Havana led to the start of the Spanish-American War. The Navy Yard is now a hub for industrial design firms, food processing businesses, and artisans, along with a growing film and television production industry. About 230 private-sector firms providing 4,000 jobs are at the Yard.

Construction and services are the fastest growing sectors.Most employers in Brooklyn are small businesses. In 2000, 91% of the approximately 38,704 business establishments in Brooklyn had fewer than 20 employees.As of August 2008[update], the borough's unemployment rate was 5.9%.

Neighborhoods

Brooklyn contains hundreds of distinct neighborhoods, representing many of the major ethnic groups found within the New York City area. The borough is home to a large African-American community. Bedford Stuyvesant is home to one of the most famous African-American communities in the city. It is a hub for African-American culture, often referenced in hip hop and African-American arts. Brooklyn's African-American and Caribbean communities are spread throughout much of Brooklyn.

Brooklyn is also home to many Russians, who are mainly concentrated in community of Brighton Beach (and surrounding communities). Brighton Beach features many Russian businesses. Because of the large Russian community, it has been nicknamed "Little Odessa."

Bushwick is largest of hub of Brooklyn's Hispanic-American community. With around 80% of Bushwick's population being Hispanic, it is a Hispanic cultural stronghold in New York City. Many businesses in the neighborhood reflect Bushwick's strong Hispanic presence. Sunset Park also has a significant number of Hispanics, with 42% of the demographics belonging to Hispanics.

Italian-Americans are mainly concentrated in the neighborhoods of Dyker Heights and Bensonhurst, where there are many Italian restaurants and pizzerias.

Chinese-Americans are scattered throughout Brooklyn, but largely concentrated in Sunset Park, which is known for Chinese culture. Many Chinese restaurants can be found throughout Sunset Park, and the area hosts a popular Chinese New Year celebration.

Orthodox Jews and Hasidic Jews are largely concentrated in Borough Park, where there are many yeshivas, synagogues, and kosher delicatessens, as well as other Jewish businesses.

Brooklyn's Irish can be found throughout Brooklyn, in low to moderate concentrations in the neighborhoods of Marine Park, Gerritsen Beach, and Vinegar Hill.

Brooklyn's Polish are largely concentrated in Greenpoint, which is home to Little Poland.

Brooklyn's Arab can be found in the Southwest portion of Brooklyn. Especially in the neighborhood of Bay Ridge, where there are many Middle Eastern restaurants, hookah lounges, and mosques.

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